GILD Recent PhD Lecture | Joseph Ackley | Gold’s Instabilities: Controlling Radiance in Medieval Art

Image
Hans Memling, Chalice of John the Evangelist, c. 1470-1475 (Washington, DC, NGA, Kress Collection, 1952.5.46b)
February 24, 2020
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Location
Pomerene Hall Room 150

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-02-24 17:30:00 2020-02-24 19:00:00 GILD Recent PhD Lecture | Joseph Ackley | Gold’s Instabilities: Controlling Radiance in Medieval Art

Gold has long served as one of the art historical hallmarks of the medieval aesthetic, prized by medievals and moderns alike for its preciousness, its durability, and its radiance.  However, as with any material, variations and varieties occur, and it is perhaps best to speak of a spectrum of “golds” in medieval art, as opposed to the rhetorically monolithic substance.  Instead of seeing gold as stable, one might see it as unstable, performative, and even volatile.  Furthermore, not only were medieval artists and audiences attuned to the instabilities of gold, but medieval art, in all its media, skillfully harnessed and exploited gold’s varability.  This lecture offers remarks on how we as art historians might best break open the category of “gold” in medieval art, especially in metalworking but also across other media traditions, while demonstrating how medieval artists themselves were already quite practiced in doing so.

Image: Hans Memling, Chalice of John the Evangelist, c. 1470-1475 (Washington, DC, NGA, Kress Collection, 1952.5.46b)

Pomerene Hall Room 150 Department of History of Art historyofart@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Gold has long served as one of the art historical hallmarks of the medieval aesthetic, prized by medievals and moderns alike for its preciousness, its durability, and its radiance.  However, as with any material, variations and varieties occur, and it is perhaps best to speak of a spectrum of “golds” in medieval art, as opposed to the rhetorically monolithic substance.  Instead of seeing gold as stable, one might see it as unstable, performative, and even volatile.  Furthermore, not only were medieval artists and audiences attuned to the instabilities of gold, but medieval art, in all its media, skillfully harnessed and exploited gold’s varability.  This lecture offers remarks on how we as art historians might best break open the category of “gold” in medieval art, especially in metalworking but also across other media traditions, while demonstrating how medieval artists themselves were already quite practiced in doing so.

Image: Hans Memling, Chalice of John the Evangelist, c. 1470-1475 (Washington, DC, NGA, Kress Collection, 1952.5.46b)